The “ban” needs to know when traveling

Prior to these countries, travelers should “pocket” some knowledge to avoid being unfairly fined. Russia’s Sputnik page has reviewed a number of strange laws in other countries. There are laws that are outdated, no longer practiced by the people in reality but they are … strange.

See also: Travel tips

The ‘ban’ needs to know when traveling

1. No video games in Greece

The Greek government has banned people from playing electronic games since 2002 - Photo: kotaku

The Greek government has banned people from playing electronic games since 2002 – Photo: kotaku

Since 2002, the Athens government has banned people from playing electronic games. The rules in the ban are rather vague because the government originally intended to ban video game machines.

In 2003, under pressure from the European Union (EU), the government was forced to amend some of the terms. However, video games are still banned in Internet cafes.

2. No “Western” haircut in Iran

Long Western hairstyles banned in Iran - Photo: AlloCiné

Long Western hairstyles banned in Iran – Photo: AlloCiné

In 2010, the Tehran government banned some hairstyles that were prevalent in the West such as ponytail or long hair. Authorities even published a newspaper featuring illustrated haircuts.

By 2015, Iran continues to ban men for “monstrous” or gay-haired hairstyles.

3. Ban on Valentine’s Day in Saudi Arabia

Saudi authorities ban people from celebrating Valentine's Day - Photo: Pixabay

Saudi authorities ban people from celebrating Valentine’s Day – Photo: Pixabay

According to local newspapers in Saudi Arabia, Valentine’s Day “promotes unethical relationships between unmarried men and women”. So, on this day, people are not allowed to celebrate or sell red items such as roses, greeting cards, boxes of chocolates …

It was this ban that made the black market flourish to serve the needs of customers.

4. Yellow clothing is prohibited in Malaysia

Group of people wearing yellow shirts to participate in anti-government rally in Malaysia in September 2015 - Photo: Reuters

Group of people wearing yellow shirts to participate in anti-government rally in Malaysia in September 2015 – Photo: Reuters

In 2011, Malaysian authorities forbade wearing yellow clothes. The smallest items such as yellow shoelaces are also prohibited.

If a violation is found, people will be fined up to € 1,000 for “security threats.”

5. Ban tomato sauce in France

France ban using tomato sauce at school cafeterias since 2011 - Photo: letpacificfood

France ban using tomato sauce at school cafeterias since 2011 – Photo: letpacificfood

Since 2011, ketchup is banned from use in school cafeterias because it is believed to damage the taste of French cuisine and contain too much sugar.

6. Do not eat Haggis in the US

Haggis was not allowed on the US menu for 40 years - Photo: hendersonhamilton

Haggis was not allowed on the US menu for 40 years – Photo: hendersonhamilton

Haggis Haggis is a traditional Scottish dish made from lamb’s heart, liver and lungs.

However, in the United States, lung lamb is a prohibited food, so Haggis is not allowed on the menu for 40 years.

7. Ban on cell phones in Cuba

Mobile phone fever among young people in Cuba - Photo: Twitter

Mobile phone fever among young people in Cuba – Photo: Twitter

Under former President Fidel Castro, only senior government officials and foreign companies were allowed to have cell phones.

In March 2008, President Raul Castro decided to lift the ban, ending the sale of mobile phones stealthily on the black market.

8. Do not eat gum in Singapore

Since 1992, the Singapore government has banned people from selling and chewing gum - Photo: Stain Eaters

Since 1992, the Singapore government has banned people from selling and chewing gum – Photo: Stain Eaters

Since 1992, the Singapore government has banned people from selling and chewing gum because the candy causes street hygiene and bad influence on the environment.

Thanks to the US-Singapore Free Trade Agreement, since 2004 this law has been loosened somewhat. Accordingly, people who chew gum for therapeutic reasons will not be fined.

9. Banning “regenerative incarnation” in China

In 2007, the Beijing government banned the “reincarnation” status without government permission. This rule is designed to prevent the false incarnation as the “living Buddha” of the Tibetans to profit.

10. Forbidden to play word compound in Romania

In the 1980s, the Romanian government banned people from playing the word puzzle - Photo: Pinterest

In the 1980s, the Romanian government banned people from playing the word puzzle – Photo: Pinterest

In the 1980s, the Bucharest government banned people from playing puzzle games because the game was “too intellectual”. However, now the ban has been lifted.

9. Ban on jasmine in Tunisia

 The Tunisian government has banned jasmine cultivation since the 2010 Jasmine Revolution - Photo: Mark Vos

The Tunisian government has banned jasmine cultivation since the 2010 Jasmine Revolution – Photo: Mark Vos

The Tunisian government has banned jasmine cultivation since the fall of the Jasmine Revolution in 2010. During the revolution, people overran the streets protesting corruption, unemployment, and rising food prices.

Rioting culminated in the overthrow of Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali and fled the country after 23 years in power.

10. Prohibits the concept of “time travel” in China

In 2011, the Beijing government banned content related to the concept of time travel to “respect history” after a series of television programs repeatedly exploit this topic.

11. Prohibition of baby walkers for babies in Canada

Since 2004, Canadian mothers were not allowed to use walkers for their children - Photo: Amazon

Since 2004, Canadian mothers are not allowed to use walkers for their children – Photo: Amazon

Since 2004, Canadian mothers are not allowed to use walkers for their children. According to the government, this car slows down the physical development of the child. Canada was also the first country to introduce this ban.

In addition, the European Union on Child Safety also advises parents not to use baby walkers.

12. McDonald’s fast food ban in Bolivia

From 2002 to 2015, visitors can not find any McDonald's in Bolivia.

From 2002 to 2015, visitors can not find any McDonald’s in Bolivia.

Although the Bolivian government is not aware of legislation that prohibits the opening of McDonald’s restaurants, from 2002 to 2015, visitors can not find any of the shops belonging to this brand.

Previously, in Bolivia McDonald’s was once but because of fast food people do not like the government has ordered to close the chain stores.

13. The mannequin shall not wear a shawl in Iran

In 2009, the Iranian government banned people from displaying mannequins in the shop without wearing a shawl - Image: Flickr

In 2009, the Iranian government banned people from displaying mannequins in the shop without wearing a shawl – Photo: Flickr

In 2009, the Iranian government banned people from displaying mannequins in the shop without wearing a hijab scarf. In addition, the mannequins must be dressed discreetly, without revealing curves. Men are also banned from selling women’s underwear.

14. Ban on plastic bags in Bangladesh

In 2002, Bangladesh became the first country in the world to ban the use of plastic bags to avoid environmental pollution. However, just a year later, dealers started distributing plastic bags despite the sanctions.

15. Do not swat in Sweden

In 1979, Sweden was the first country to apply a ban on levitation - Photo: Le Figaro

In 1979, Sweden was the first country to apply a ban on levitation – Photo: Le Figaro

In 1979, Sweden was the first country to apply a ban on stabbing but with little success. Instead of bringing positive value, this law has the same consequences as children accusing parents or children of leaving home because of slapping.

However, many other countries such as Finland, Norway and Austria still decide to apply this law to protect children.

16. Prohibited women driving in Saudi Arabia

Saudi women are not prohibited from driving, but never get a license - Photo: Kippreport

Saudi women are not prohibited from driving, but never get a license – Photo: Kippreport

In Saudi Arabia, in theory, women are not prohibited from driving. However, the government did not issue a license for them. If they drive without a license, they will be fined.

In April 2016, Mohammad bin Salman Al Saud said that “the society is still not convinced of women driving,” and even this has caused many “negative consequences”. .

17. Free naming is prohibited in Denmark

In Denmark, parents must choose a child’s name from the list of over 24,000 available names. If you want to put a name out of the list, parents must apply for permission.

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